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Thread: ~NooR JeHaN~

      
   
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    ~NooR JeHaN~



    In the Ice Candy Man, written in the backdrop of 1947's Partition, Bapsi Sidhwa wrote: "And the gramophones and speakers mounted on tongas and lorries scratchily, endlessly pouring out the melody of Noor Jehan's popular film song that is now so strangely apt," Mere bachpan ke sathi mujhe bhool na jana, dekho, dekho hanse na zamana, hanse na zamana. When director Deepa Mehta made the novel into the movie Earth, she chose the same voice from the same 1946 hit Anmol ghari, but a different song: Jawan hai mohabbat, haseen hai zamana.

    The songs were composed by Naushad. After Noor Jehan's death in December 23, 2000, Naushad exclaimed, "She had done me an honour, it was not the other way round. She made my songs immortal." Both Naushad and Noor Jehan had tears in their eyes when Noor Jehan had stood up to sing Awaz de kahan hai, dunya meri jawan hai on stage in Bombay for the show Mortal men, immortal melodies during her visit to India in 1982, 36 years after Anmol ghari.

    In the early 90s Salam Bombay (1988) and Monsoon Wedding's (2001) Indian film director Mira Nair made Mississippi Masala. The song she chose for the backdrop of her Hollywood film was Noor Jehan's rendition of Faiz Ahmad Faiz's Mujh se pehli si mohabbat mere mehboob na mang. The poem, which Faiz had gifted to Noor Jehan, found a place in the history of Urdu literature and music.


    After Noor Jehan's death the Indian nightingale Lata Mangeshkar said on stage in Mumbai, "Maine unke suron ki ungli pakar kar gana seekha hai," (By holding the fingers of her notes have I learned to sing). Lata owed her entry into Mumbai filmdom to the two Noor Jehan numbers she had sung for her first audition. As an upcoming singer, Lata had idolized Noor Jehan, who had already been proclaimed Malika-i-Tarannum for her song Bulbulo mat ro yahan in the 1945 movie Zeenat.

    In 1947, the 21 year old singer-actress left India for Pakistan. Leaving behind the hat-trick successes of Zeenat, Anmol ghari and Jugnu (1947) - the Noor Jehan/Dilip Kumar starrer which was still running to packed houses inspite of violent riots. For millions the lines of Noor Jehan and Mohammad Rafi's duet, Yunhi dunya badalti hai, isi ka nam dunya hai had become a real-life experience.


    But when the blind village girl sang on a moonlit night in Intezar (1956), Chand hansey dunya basey roae mera pyar, there was no doubt left that Noor Jehan's would never be a loser's choice. She had left behind associations with directors like Mehboob and composers like Naushad, but here she had the golden opportunity to work with music genius Khurshid Anwar, a psychologist by training and a musician by choice. Noor Jehan danced and sang on his compositions, in movies like Intezar and Koel (1959). The latter was her last movie as an actress. She continued to sing Khurshid Anwar's songs as a playback singer for the next 10 years, the ultimate climax being Heer Ranjha (1970). Other masters who composed for her golden voice were Ghulam Haider - Khandan (1942) in India, Gulnar (1953) in Pakistan, Feroz Nizami - Jugnu in India, Chan wey (1951) and Dupatta (1952) in Pakistan, Rasheed Atrey - Anarkali (1958) and Moseeqar (1962), Nisar Bazmi - Lakhon mein aik (1967), Nag Manni (1972) and Umrao jan ada (1972). Rasheed Attrey's son Wajahat Atrey scored the music for most of her fast Punjabi tracks that she sang through the 80s and 90s.

    Noor Jehan was a versatile performer. The Kasur born Allah Wasai (born on September 21, 1926, in to a poor musician family) started her musical career in Calcutta at the age of nine, as a singing child star in Pind di kuri (1935), which was the subcontinent's first Punjabi film. Her very first song, an instant hit, was a Punjabi folk tune - Lang aja patan chana da o yar. She later sang difficult Urdu compositions like Aaj ki raat saaz-i-dil-i-purdard na chaer (Jugnu), rustic Punjabi numbers like Mundiya Sialkotia (Chan wey), then patriotic songs during the 1965 war which made her a symbol of national unity. She sang in other regional languages as well, such as songs for Pakistan's first color movie in Sindhi - Ghungat lahe kunwar.

    During the early 80s and again in the early 90s, she sang for PTV's Tarannum, a sequence of exquisite ghazals penned by Ghalib, Dagh, Faiz and Ahmad Faraz. Indian singer Asha Bhosle sang eight of these as a tribute to South Asia's Melody Queen in her album Kashish.

    When she died film writer, lyricist and poet Javed Akhtar said in an interview in Mumbai "In the worst conditions of our relations with Pakistan in 53 years, in a very hostile atmosphere, our cultural heritage has been a common bridge. Noor Jehan was one such durable bridge. While politics could not shatter that bridge, my fear is that her death may have shaken it."

    Singer-actress Noorjehan, who rose to fame by breaking all odds, compelled producers and composers with her talent to enter into monopolistic agreements despite having a hearing problem and a troubled married life, says a new book.

    "Noorjehan insisted, and at times, forced the producers and composers to sign her for all songs in their films. She would even demand advance payment for songs yet to be recorded," writes Aijaz Gul in "Mallika-E-Tarannum Noorjehan: the Melody Queen".

    "Her songs became extremely popular, and most of the producers were more than glad to enter into such monopolistic agreements, notwithstanding her exuberant and, at times, outrageous rates," he says.

    The success story of Noorjehan from her first song on stage at the tender age of six to her swan-song "Ki dam da bharosa yaar" (her last song from "Sakhi Badshah") in 1997 is an incredible story of laughter, tears and melodrama.

    Born in Qasoor (Punjab) of undivided India in 1926, Noorjehan perfected her classical singing under Ustad Ghulam Mohammad Khan and enthralled the audience with her personality which was a rare blend of beauty, voice, acting and success.

    After partition she moved to Pakistan following her marriage to filmmaker Shaukat Hussain Rizvi. But they were later divorced and she then married Eijaz Durrani, which also had a bitter ending. She had a number of whirlwind affairs with leading Pakistani men. Noorjehan, who belted popular numbers like "Jawan hai mohabbat haseen hai zamana" ("Anmol Ghadi"), "Awaz de kahan hai" ("Anmol Ghadi") and "Diya jala kar aap bujhaya" ("Bari Maa") was hard of hearing.

    "She could hear little from her right ear but she never revealed this physical disability to anyone. She once told a reporter that whenever someone talks to her from the right side, she quickly turns her left ear to that person," Gul writes.

    Though as an actress she was not rated very high, but film songs recorded in her sprightly and emotion-charged voice had no parallel, Gul writes.

    She was an inspiration for many, including Lata Mangeshkar and Asha Bhonsle.

    Former Afghanistan King Zahir Shah was a die hard fan of hers. He had a huge collection of her songs from the 1940s onwards and preserved all the disks in hidden shelves in his Kabul Palace so well that even the Taliban raids and bombings could not destroy his treasure.

    Lata described Noorjehan as the most popular singer. "Noorjehan did not need musicians to make her impact. She was the real melody queen," India's Nightingale once said.

    Gul says Noorjehan was one of those singers who would get down from her ivory-coloured Mercedes right in front of the recording hall in the studios.

    "Walking from the studio's parking lot to the recording hall was an insult to her. For her and many others, being driven inside the studios was a privilege reserved only for the high and mighty and was a status symbol. However, there were many who considered it nothing but arrogance," Gul, the Islamabad-based writer and film critic, says.

    Noorjehan was quite interested in cooking. "I like cooking and inviting people to taste my food. I have spoiled the taste buds of my children. I still prepare at least one dish for them," the book quotes Noorjehan as saying on her cooking skills.

    "I feel happy when I see my friends, brothers and sisters sitting around my dining table, enjoying the food. You won't believe how much pleasure I get out of that experiences," she said.

    In 1954, Lata was in Amritsar to record a song. Lata called Noorjehan and they met at Wagah. According to Lata, they were like two prisoners. Noorjehan gave her a packet and the security forces stationed there were curious to know its contents.

    Lata opened the packet containing a rice dish and mango dessert, the book says.

    "Didi had prepared the dishes with her own hands. They were just dishes of friendship, from one friend to another," lata had said.

    Noorjehan was also instrumental in honing Lata's Urdu skills.

    "When I started singing, I did not have the right pronunciation and diction in Urdu. Noorjehan corrected me and improved my Urdu pronunciation," the book quoted Lata as saying.

    Asha once said of Noorjehan "the world will never see a singer like her. Just as people have not seen another Mohammad Rafi or Kishore Kumar there would never be another Noorjehan."





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    nikamma larka is offline Banned
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    Re: ~NooR JeHaN~

    gr8 singer & actress

    thnx 4 shrng

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    Pukhtana_4_Lyfe is offline ♥♠♥~M!zz M@gRooR~♥♠♥
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    Re: ~NooR JeHaN~

    yup she was a great singer and a superb actress.

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